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Unit 16: In the news

Day four: Writing a sports article

Objective

  • Students will be able to read a variety of materials related to sports.
  • Students will be able to discuss current events related to sports.
  • Students will be able to write a newspaper article relating a sports event, using past tenses and short strings of paragraphs.

Setting the Stage (5 minutes)

Teacher reads aloud an article about a hypothetical sports event that occurred in the country in which the Target Language is spoken. Teacher can usually find such information on the Internet.

Teacher leads student discussion and responds to student questions. Teacher encourages students' personal reactions to the article just read.

Input (10 minutes)

Students, in pairs, read two sports-related articles gathered by Teacher from the Internet. (Teacher has either found two original Target Language articles on Internet or has translated two sports articles from L1 (the students' common language) into the Target Language.)

Guided Practice (10 minutes)

Student pairs fill out two Pyramid of the Story graphic organizers (one for each article) to show understanding of the text in the articles.

Independent Practice (25 minutes)

Students gather in their newspaper groups. Groups work together to write two sports articles for their group newspaper.

Groups choose roles to facilitate this writing process:

  • Discussion leader (who calls on fellow group-mates for discussion)
  • Secretaries (2 students who write text of articles)
  • Time keeper (who assures that no one student dominates the discussion for too long)

Closure (5 minutes)

Teacher collects the two sports articles from each group. Teacher will edit and return to group the following day.

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